A Brief History of the Early Days of Baseball

Baseball pic

Baseball
Image: history.com

A student through Linn-Benton iLearn, Cody Gotchall has studied everything from science and math to woodworking and engineering. He possesses a unique passion for recognizing patterns in mathematics and other activities and enjoys the strategies involved in baseball. Cody Gotchall also enjoys watching baseball due to its varying pace.

Most historians agree that the game of baseball has its roots in the English game rounders. However, specific details about the sport’s development did not start appearing until 1845. During this year, Alexander Cartwright, who is often viewed as the father of baseball, developed a clear set of rules for the game and established a baseball team. Known as the Knickerbocker Baseball Club of New York City, Cartwright’s team faced off against the New York Baseball Club in the first recorded game of baseball in 1846. Although Cartwright’s team lost, the event started baseball down the path of popularity.

In 1858, amateur baseball players formed the National Association of Baseball Players. This organization was the world’s first baseball league, and it began charging admission to baseball games. In the 1860s, baseball began spreading around the United States and more than 100 teams were represented during the 1868 annual baseball convention.

Baseball soon turned into a professional sport when the Cincinnati Red Stockings started paying players in 1969. This turn toward professionalism altered the way the National Association was run. Rather than being led by the players, the organization was run by businessmen and it changed its name to the National League.

Before long, the rival American Association was formed, followed by the Union Association and the Players League. These groups eventually disbanded, and the American League was formed in 1901. Two years later the first World Series was played.

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