True and Apparent Wind and How They Affect Boating

True and Apparent Wind pic

True and Apparent Wind
Image: nauticed.org

Oregon native Cody Gotchall studies at Linn-Benton Community College through the institution’s iLearn program. He also volunteers at various local organizations and has held various positions relating to yard and animal care. In his free time, Cody Gotchall enjoys boating.

There are two types of wind that sailors must familiarize themselves with: true wind and apparent wind.

True wind is the wind that a person feels while stationary. Weather forecasts report on the speed and direction of true wind, and this type of wind affects how water moves in the ocean or on a lake.

Meanwhile, apparent wind is a combination of true wind and the wind generated by movement. For example, a person riding a bike feels wind in his face regardless of the direction or presence of true wind. The wind felt is the apparent wind. Sailors feel this wind while their boat is moving.

Sailors need to understand true and apparent wind because it affects how their boats move. When a boat sails with the true wind behind it, it will move more slowly because the apparent wind speed has decreased. However, boats sailing with the true wind in front of them or to their sides generate more apparent wind speed, which helps the vessels move faster.

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Making a Basic Barbecue Sauce

 

Barbecue Sauce pic

Barbecue Sauce
Image: allrecipes.com

Dedicated community servant and student Cody Gotchall is enrolled in at Linn-Benton Community College’s iLearn program. Cody Gotchall loves making and enjoying barbecue ribs and is very particular about the ribs and sauce. He enjoys pork that is moist and barbecue sauce that is well-balanced without being bland.

Making your own barbecue sauce is much simpler than you may think. Most barbecue sauces, at least those that are tomato-based, start with three ingredients: ketchup, honey, and mustard. For roughly two cups of barbecue sauce, combine 1/4 cup yellow mustard, 1/4 cup honey, and 1 1/2 cup of ketchup. This will create a simple barbecue sauce base that balances sweet, salty, and tangy flavors.

From this base, you can add additional ingredients to your barbecue sauce, such as salt, garlic powder, smoked paprika, or Worcestershire sauce. These additional ingredients help you jazz up your barbecue sauce and tailor it to the specific meal you are planning. There are nearly limitless combinations when it comes to adding ingredients, so don’t be afraid to experiment with different flavors until your find your perfect sauce.

You can also substitute some of the basic ingredients for more exciting ones, such as using Dijon mustard instead of yellow mustard or molasses rather than honey.

Three Lifetime Benefits of Learning Mathematics

 

OSU’s Jake Thompson Selected by Boston Red Sox in MLB Draft

 

Jake Thompson pic

Jake Thompson
Image: milb.com

A student at Linn-Benton Community College, Cody Gotchall is a passionate community volunteer who has worked with nonprofit organizations such as the Heartland Humane Society and Habitat for Humanity. Cody Gotchall is a former Oregon State University (OSU) student and enjoys following the school’s baseball team.

For the second consecutive year, the OSU Beavers have had five players selected in the annual Major League Baseball (MLB) Amateur Draft. One player, Jake Thompson, a 6-foot-1, 200-pound right-handed pitcher, was selected in the fourth round by the Boston Red Sox. A native of Florence, Oregon, Thompson spent four seasons at OSU, where he compiled a career win-loss record of 20-7 to go along with an earned run average (ERA) of 3.14. He allowed only 181 hits and struck out 199 batters through 232 innings. He had a career-best season in 2017 when he won 14 of his 19 starts and recorded an impressive ERA of 1.96.

On July 7 Thompson agreed to a professional contract worth $350,000, which is roughly $45,000 below the slot value for where he was selected. Upon signing with the Red Sox he was sent to the Lowell Spinners, the team’s minor-league affiliate in the New York-Pennsylvania League.