Basic Rules of Cribbage

 

Cribbage pic
Cribbage
Image: reference.com

As a student at Linn-Benton Community College, Cody Gotchall has enjoyed math- and science-based coursework. Cody Gotchall developed his enthusiasm for math as a youth when his father taught him cribbage as a way of engaging with arithmetic concepts.

Popular since the 17th century, cribbage challenges players to add card values to reach a total of 121 points. Scoring takes place using a wooden board that typically features four rows of 30 holes each. Players receive two pegs, which leapfrog over one another during scoring to indicate both total score and per-hand score.

Most games of cribbage are of the six-hand variety. Using a standard pack of 52 cards, a dealer gives six cards to each player, two of which the player chooses to place face down. These cards become part of the crib, which serves as an extra hand for the dealer.

Players then lay down cards one at a time and add their totals. Players must stop before their hand reaches 31 points, and the last player to lay down a card receives an extra point. Bonus point options include two points for a score of exactly 15 or for two of a kind, while six points are available for three of a kind and 12 for four of a kind.

Scoring rules also include extra points for a run, or sequence, which are worth more points the longer they become. Cards of the same suit are worth points as well, though the crib can only receive this bonus if all five cards share a suit.

A Handful of Bruce Springsteen’s Best Songs about Social Justice

Bruce Springsteen
Image: BruceSpringsteen.net

Cody Gotchall is a student at Linn-Benton Community College who has an interest in several different academic fields, including engineering and business. In his free time, Cody Gotchall enjoys listening to the music of Bruce Springsteen, especially because of the social-justice themes present in his lyrics.

One of his most poignant songs is American Skin, which is about the death of unarmed Guinean man Amadou Diallo at the hands of four New York City police officers. The song expresses outrage at the tragedy while also taking an empathetic stance toward the police. American Skin has only become more meaningful in the era of Black Lives Matter.

Youngstown remains one of Springsteen’s most popular songs. At its heart, the song denounces the military industrial complex of the United States and asks what American citizens really need and deserve when they come home from war.

A newer but incredibly moving Springsteen song is We Are Alive. The song takes listeners through a cemetery as various ghosts visit the singer and evoke some of the most meaningful struggles in American history, including the civil rights, labor, and immigration movements.

The Ghost of Tom Joad is one of Springsteen’s most important songs. Released during the economic boom of the 1990s and named after the protagonist of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, the song is a powerful reminder that there are always people living in the margins and these people need an advocate.

Benedict Cumberbatch’s Sherlock Continues in Fourth Year of BBC Series

Sherlock Holmes in the popular BBC series Sherlock

Cody Gotchall is a student at Linn-Benton Community College in Oregon who has focused his academic efforts on data analytics and a STEM curriculum. Considering Sir Arthur Conan Doyle one of his favorite authors, Cody Gotchall enjoys Benedict Cumberbatch’s ongoing portrayal of iconic 19th-century detective Sherlock Holmes in the popular BBC series Sherlock.

With the fourth season of Sherlock having kicked off on New Year’s Day of 2017, the detective portrayed by Cumberbatch in a contemporary setting has been described as evolving into a “kinder” character who is able to find more empathy for those around him. This seems a necessary trait for survival, as the series takes a darker turn in a case that starts with the seemingly pointless theft of six plaster busts of former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

As described by Sherlock costar Amanda Abbington, the appeal of Cumberbatch’s Sherlock is his “unashamed intellectualism” in an age of sound bytes. What he represents is particularly reassuring in this era of of dumbed-down presidential debates and news of questionable veracity.

A Brief History of the Early Days of Baseball

Baseball pic
Baseball
Image: history.com

A student through Linn-Benton iLearn, Cody Gotchall has studied everything from science and math to woodworking and engineering. He possesses a unique passion for recognizing patterns in mathematics and other activities and enjoys the strategies involved in baseball. Cody Gotchall also enjoys watching baseball due to its varying pace.

Most historians agree that the game of baseball has its roots in the English game rounders. However, specific details about the sport’s development did not start appearing until 1845. During this year, Alexander Cartwright, who is often viewed as the father of baseball, developed a clear set of rules for the game and established a baseball team. Known as the Knickerbocker Baseball Club of New York City, Cartwright’s team faced off against the New York Baseball Club in the first recorded game of baseball in 1846. Although Cartwright’s team lost, the event started baseball down the path of popularity.

In 1858, amateur baseball players formed the National Association of Baseball Players. This organization was the world’s first baseball league, and it began charging admission to baseball games. In the 1860s, baseball began spreading around the United States and more than 100 teams were represented during the 1868 annual baseball convention.

Baseball soon turned into a professional sport when the Cincinnati Red Stockings started paying players in 1969. This turn toward professionalism altered the way the National Association was run. Rather than being led by the players, the organization was run by businessmen and it changed its name to the National League.

Before long, the rival American Association was formed, followed by the Union Association and the Players League. These groups eventually disbanded, and the American League was formed in 1901. Two years later the first World Series was played.