Bruce Springsteen Features in Annual Hungerthon Event

 

Hungerthon pic

Hungerthon
Image: Hungerthon.org

A student at Linn-Benton Community College, Cody Gotchall studies in Albany, Oregon, and has a passion for reading and music. One of Cody Gotchall’s favorite musicians is Bruce Springsteen, whom he admires for his melodic sensibility and the concern for social justice that runs through both his music and his actions as a public figure.

With the Boss having enjoyed a triumphant one man acoustic show, ‘Springsteen On Broadway,’ in 2017, he also gave his blessing to a recent Thanksgiving benefit at the Wonder Bar in Asbury Park. The annual Hungerthon benefits the nonprofit WhyHunger, which was cofounded by radio host Bill Ayres and musician Harry Chapin. Due to the popularity of a similar event held four years before, the 2017 Hungerthon featured nonstop Springsteen music for 24 hours.

A longtime supporter of WhyHunger, Bruce Springsteen donated a ‘Land of Hope and Dreams’ t-shirt and baseball cap to the Hungerthon. He is also active with Artists Against Hunger & Poverty as a founding member.

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The American Red Cross Works to Prevent Home Fires

 

Red Cross pic

Red Cross
Image: redcross.org

In 2014, Cody Gotchall graduated from Crescent Valley High School, where he was an honors student and a member of the school’s robotics team. Since graduating from high school, he has studied at Oregon State University and Linn-Benton Community College. Alongside his academic pursuits, Cody Gotchall has supported several community organizations over the years, including the American Red Cross.

In its efforts to help individuals and families prepare for emergencies, the Red Cross oversees its Home Fire Campaign, which aims to reduce the number of fire-related injuries and deaths in the United States. Through the campaign, the organization works alongside community partners and volunteers to install free smoke alarms and provide educational programs focused on fire safety and preparedness.

Since launching the Home Fire Campaign in 2014, the Red Cross and its partners have installed over 1 million free smoke alarms. The organization also replaced over 50,000 smoke alarm batteries while helping families nationwide develop home fire escape plans.

In 2018, the Red Cross will continue to advance the Home Fire Campaign with Sound the Alarm events across the country. From April 28 to May 13, the organization plans to install 100,000 smoke alarms during events in over 100 major US cities. To learn more, visit www.soundthealarm.org.

Pegging in Cribbage

Pegging pic

Pegging
Image: britannica.com

When Cody Gotchall was younger, his father taught him cribbage as a way of learning pattern recognition and math. Now a student at Linn-Benton Community College in Albany, Oregon, Cody Gotchall enjoys winning cribbage matches against his father and other members of their family.

To win at cribbage, a player must become adept at the process of pegging. This involves identifying point-earning situations and taking the appropriate points by moving one’s pegs along the scoreboard.

One of the foundational pegging moments is referred to as “Go,” which occurs when a player’s card prevents his or her opponent from adding a card that would keep the running total under 31. When this happens, the latter player says “Go,” and the player who came closest to 31 pegs one point.

A player can peg two points by putting down a card that creates a total of 15. Other pegging situations depend on the relationship between the two cards. For example, in the case of a pair, two points are awarded to a player who adds a card with the same rank as the card most recently put down. A sequence of three yields three points and four of a rank, also known as a double pair or double pair royal, is worth four.

Similarly, a player who creates a sequence of three cards, regardless of rank, can peg three points. Sequences of four are worth four points and sequences of five are worth five points. Sequences, also known as runs, do not need to be in numerical order but must be uninterrupted. This means that a play of 4-7-5-6 is a run but a play of 4-7-5-5-6 is not, as an extra five is present.

OSU Outfielder Michael Conforto

Michael Conforto pic

Michael Conforto
Image: osubeavers.com

Cody Gotchall studied at Oregon State University (OSU), where he particularly enjoyed taking science, and mathematics classes. Since middle school, Cody Gotchall has followed the OSU Beavers baseball team.

Today, the OSU baseball team has nine players on Major League Baseball team rosters. Considered one of the most successful former Beavers, outfielder Michael Conforto now plays for the New York Mets. Conforto graduated from OSU in 2014, and is among the top offensive talents in the school’s history. He is also the only OSU alumnus to be named All-American every year he played (2012-14).

The 10th overall selection by the New York Mets in the 2014 MLB Draft, Conforto helped his team advance to the World Series in his rookie season. In Game 4 of the 2015 World Series against the Kansas City Royals, Conforto notched two home runs, becoming the first rookie to do so in a World Series.

He is also just the third player in history to play in all three world series events – the Little League World Series, the College World Series, and the MLB World Series.